Thursday, 20 July 2017

5 in 5 - Melanie - July 2017




Melanie is my friend who lives in Australia and she loves photography.  Every month since the start of this challenge Melanie has taken part in this monthly meme and as she doesn't have her own blog, I post here. I love that we have found a way for her to take part.
This month Melanie told me she was lacking inspiration so she took 2 sets of photos. Undecided which one to send, Melanie sent both and asked me to choose. I think you'll agree, both are winners!  Over to you Melanie:


"We are now in winter here in Adelaide with cold days (yes, sometimes during the day it drops below 10˚c) and sometimes barely a day passes without rain.  The rain I do not mind providing I am indoors in front of a fire.  It cheers me to take a walk around our garden when there is no rain and so  my 5 in 5 photos for July were taken as I took a wander around our garden with my camera catching the colour that greets me.  As it happens it is difficult to select just five photos from the many I took as colour is everywhere.  The five photos I have chosen are:-

  • On the left of the photo a red kangaroo paw.  Over the years I have had many kangaroo paws as they are not a plant with a long life.  The name was given to it since the flower resembles a kangaroo paw.  It is a flower that has been adopted as the state emblem of Western Australia.  Here in South Australia the flower emblem is the Sturt Desert Pea which I have seen in the wild but never been able to grow in my garden.
  • In the middle of my photo is a winter flowering Narcissus.  This flower greets me as I come out of my back door.  I have a small border there full of narcissus who never fail to appear despite the bed being neglected during the year.
  • On the top RHS photo is the snowflake.  It is similar to the snowdrop which grows wild in the UK but is much taller and usually has several flowers on each stem and even petals on the flower.  They are a self-seeding flower and come up each year around the bed where our apple tree lives.
  • The middle RHS photo is of marigolds.  I have clumps of yellow and orange marigold splattered around the garden popping up in the herb garden and veg plots as well as the flower beds.  They self-seed marvellously and there seem to be marigolds flowering throughout every season.
  • My final choice is of the lily which sits by our fish pond.  Currently there is a mass of the white flowers.

I hope you have enjoyed at look at some of the colour in our garden but I am smiling to myself as of the photos I have chosen three of them have white flowers.  There were other colours for example my lavender and fuchsia are not white and there is a single lemon on our lemon tree. However I didn’t select these as my 5 in 5".








 "My 5 in 5 for July is showing off some of the cards I have been busy making during the past couple of weeks.  Card making is a hobby of mine which I have indulged in over many years trying to make birthday cards for family and friends and then Christmas cards for many of the same.  It is quite consuming and lately I have resorted to buying Christmas cards to save time during a busy period or just sending a Christmas email.  In July and August there are several of our family and friends who have birthdays. As I set myself to making cards I got carried away and now in my card stock should have enough to see me through to the end of the year which will give me more time to spend on Christmas cards.  Every year I promise myself to start making Christmas cards in August but it doesn’t seem to happen.  Maybe this year I really will.  So having explained my card making efforts here are five photo arrangements of some of the cards I have been busy making.  The top LHS shows cards for two nieces with birthdays in September.  One of them will be 18 and the other 17.  I always find it quicker if I make more than one card of the same design so allow the ages of these nieces is different I have used the same design.  This idea of using the same design for cards is reflected in the group of cards on the top RHS.  I used photos of flowers that I had taken and placed them under a frame cut on my cutting machine.  The bottom LHS cards use a flower or leaf theme.  I did leaf cut-outs which I used on two cards and the inverse of those cut outs I used with flowers on the other two cards.  The middle bottom photo is of several cards I made but because there are so many they may be difficult to see.  The final two age cards are again for nieces.  I have rather a lot of nieces and nephews.  These are mostly on my husband’s side as he has six siblings all of whom are married with children.  I just have two brothers".























Thank you Melanie!  It is always lovely to see a garden on the other side of the world, and who would think it was winter with so much colour and bloom?!  Melanie's card making efforts put me to shame. Once a maker of cards I find myself buying more and more. I should follow Melanie's example and set time aside for a making session, as the effort of getting everything out to make one card at a time means it doesn't happen. What about you? If you are a card maker, how do you plan and achive this?

Thanks for popping by, and I look forward to another post from Melanie next month. Meanwhile: 



If this has inspired you to pick up your camera and join in please go to the original post where you will also find out how to link in.


And to find out more about this monthly photo challenge, and how this started, please go to this post.


Wednesday, 5 July 2017

5 in 5 - July 2017 - A trip down memory lane


Welcome to '5 in 5' where on the 5th of
each month I post 5 photos that I have
taken in 5 minutes.




The other week we had time away in the campervan and stayed in a wonderful location on the bank of the River Severn. You could walk along the edge of the river for miles in each direction, and we did!

Stourport was one place we visited frequently.  It has an interesting history and is the start of a canal. Apparently it was once a heaving inland port and there is much that suggests it was also a thriving town. 



Sadly the industrial days are gone and many of the huge buildings are abandoned and left in decay. It was a wonderful photo opportunity as I love taking photos of old doors and buildings. And despite this loss there are still beautiful buildings and much else to see. But what caught my attention for this months '5in5' was a surprise. A vintage fairground on the river bank! It took me right back to my childhood....

As I walked round I could imagine the smell of candyfloss and toffee apples, sticky and hot after being dipped into the thicky syrup.



Remember slides like this?!  I'd tick my legs and arms in so that I didn't get friction burns!


And it was the same for the helter skelter! Arms and  legs in, GO!!!


 Remember the scratch of coir mat as you landed?!

Those were the days of simple pleasures and it was so good to discover this fairground and nostalgic memories.

And I'm throwing an extra photo in this time, because this reflection seems symbolic, with me standing between the past and present.  


I was spoilt for choice what photos to show this month as Stourport was rich pickings. It's lovely to explore an area that has so much to offer and it is somewhere we will definitely revisit!

Thank you for popping by. And if you fancy picking up your camera to join in with '5in5' it would be lovely to have your company!

   


Here's what you do and there are more details here



1.  Choose a location.

2.  Have your camera ready.

3.  Set a timer for 5 minutes (I use my mobile phone).

4.  Take as many photos you can (or wish to) until the time is up.

5.  Choose 5 photos to download and share by using the link tool below.

                              You have until the 25th of the month to add your photos.

Please add your link below if you would like to take part. I am often excited and inspired by the ideas and photos of others so thank you to JoAnn, Melanie, Mary-Lou, Karen, Maggie, Joy and Borqna for joining in last month. I'll be in August with another 5in5. Enjoy the weeks in between and happy photo taking!



Wednesday, 7 June 2017

5 in 5 - Melanie - June 2017




Melanie is my friend who lives in Australia and she loves photography.  Every month since the start of this challenge Melanie has taken part in this monthly meme and as she doesn't have her own blog I post here. I love that we have found a way for her to take part, so over to you Melanie:


"Having been disappointed that the pelicans in my chosen spot for a 5 in 5 last month were nowhere to be seen I decided to have something more static for this month.  I went into the city of Adelaide with the intention of using roof tops for a theme and here are the five that have made it into my June arrangement.  I walked down North Terrace to the Adelaide Art Gallery and most of the photos were taken from the lawn at the back of the gallery.  The middle photo though was taken while I was on North Terrace and is of the clock tower on the NE corner of the Myer Centre Building.  The four surrounding photos were taken from the lawn as I stood in one spot looking around me.  Next to the art gallery is the main campus of Adelaide University.  The top Left hand picture is of the steeple on the front of The Mitchell Building on North Terrace.  The Mitchell building was the first building to be erected for the University of Adelaide being built between 1879 and 1881.  It is known for being an example of the Gothic Revival from the second half of the nineteenth century.  It is now occupied by the administration areas of the University.  The bottom right hand photo is on another University building roof top.  This building is called Elder Hall also on North Terrace.  It is a concert and performance venue and is part of the Elder Conservatorium.  The Elder Conservatorium is the oldest tertiary music school in Australia.  The hall was built in 1900.The other two photos are of accommodation.  The bottom Left hand photo is of flats on top of a Wilson car park at 198 North Terrace.  The top right hand photo is of East West Student accommodation on North Terrace".








I like Melanie's theme for this months’ photos. It’s good sometimes just to stand in one place and look around.  Roof tops can be fascinating and these photos include an interesting collection of styles and age.  It’s nice to learn a little about them too, thank you, Melanie.   


If this has inspired you to pick up your camera and join in please go to the original post where you will also find out how to link in.


And to find out more about this monthly photo challenge, and how this started, please go to this post.

Monday, 5 June 2017

5 in 5 - June 2017 - Churchyards and Water Meadows

Welcome to '5 in 5' where on the 5th of
each month I post 5 photos that I have
taken in 5 minutes.



I often take '5 in 5' photos during the month but you never know what unexpected surprise will turn up. This weekend we were in Cambridgeshire and we went for a walk across Portholme Meadow. This is the largest water meadow in England and it has an interesting history; once used for flying monoplanes, and later by the Flying Corps during World War One. Nowadays it has a more sedate pastime and it is a haven for wildlife and nature. Here's some of the photos I took:


Sadly it's not often we see wild flower meadows like this, any more.



Imagine my joy at seeing this skylark on the ground. We had enjoyed watching it fly overhead and then it landed in front of us!  

 
Our walk led into Huntingdon, a town that is steeped in history and birth place to Oliver Cromwell. We followed a trail and I took the opportunity to take more 5 in 5 photos. So for this month I am going to include a second set, taken in St John's Churchyard. The church itself was damaged in the 17th century Civil War and demolished about 1660.

 




It was a great weekend of contrast. As well as walking miles, I also spent six hours canoeing along the River Ouse. I am a novice and haven't been in a canoe for a couple of years, so if I had known our trip was 13 miles long I might have been concerned. In fairness, we were given the option of having the canoe and ourselves transported back at the half way point, but my canoe partner and I were game for the whole trip and we loved every minute of it. As I lost my mobile to water during my sailing trip last year I wasn't going to risk damage again, so no photos to share. It felt strange seeing wonderful sights that I could not capture, but since my son always tells me off for seeing life through a camera lens it was a different experience. I shall hold memory of all the sights and wildlife we saw in my mind instead!

If you fancy picking up your camera to join in with 5in5 it would be lovely to have your company!   

Here's what you do and there are more details here

1.  Choose a location.

2.  Have your camera ready.

3.  Set a timer for 5 minutes (I use my mobile phone).

4.  Take as many photos you can (or wish to) until the time is up.

5.  Choose 5 photos to download and share by using the link tool below.

                              You have until the 25th of the month to add your photos.


Please add your link below if you would like to take part. I am often excited and inspired by the ideas and photos of others so thank you to Melanie, Eileen, Paula, Mary-Lou, Melissa, Karen, Maggie, and Borqna for joining in last month. I'll be in July with another 5 in 5. Enjoy the weeks in between and happy photo taking!


Wednesday, 31 May 2017

Turn the Page artists book fair - Part Two

As promised I am back with the second part of my visit to the 'Turn the Page' artists' book fair.  If you missed the previous post you might want to see that first, here.

After a short break for refreshments and fresh air we went back to complete our viewing. It gets tiring when you are standing for hours and super excited about everything you see! Energy restored, we started where we had left off....

First stop was Chris Ruston, one of my friends whose work I had seen in progress.  It was lovely to see it close up and unfortunately I was so busy looking and talking that I didn't take many photos. That will surprise those who know me!! Chris has been working on a project about whales, and it developed into a social history based on real life journals belonging to the captain of a whaling ship and his wife. Life was hard in those days and his wife spent three years on board, giving birth to two babies at sea. Here's some photos that I did take:


One of my favourite parts of this collection is a box with journals belonging to a sea captain and his wife. These are based on actual ones that Chris saw in Hull Museum. There is beautiful attention to detail with a clay pipe, ladies Victorian dip pen, and other interesting artefacts.

Part of the collection includes 2 large books, which you can see in the first photo. The hand printed paper used to cover the books, and
elsewhere in the collection, is beautiful, and the photo does not do it justice. Inside the books are bone shaped pages. Chris has added a video to her Instagram and this is worth checking out.



I think you'll agree that this art work is pretty amazing!

It was also lovely to see Karen Apps, another friend and whose work I have seen coming together. Karen slow stitches and has patience extraordinaire! 




This dressing gown is one of my favourite pieces, the tiny stitched writing is taken from a vintage letter. I wish I had asked more about the story behind it. I realised with hindsight that my energy was flagging after so many hours and I missed opportunities.   Next year I will spread my visit over the 2 days! Luckily I can go back to Karen and ask her to tell me more....





Another friend exhibiting was Paula Macgregor. She is a mixed media artist and enjoys making assemblages with narrative.


Below is one of Paula's most recent projects, a grandmother clock that tells the story of matriarchy. Just as we are connected by
family, each book is attached by a chain and decorated with beautiful vintage linen.



Another of Paula's work is a curiosity that could be a museum piece. The story is so convincing....


Like the grandmother clock, there is so much detail in the next curiosity box that you could happily loose another hour or two looking at. The story is based around the book shown on the door. As you unwind the scroll it reveals a code which you work out from clues in the book, revealing another tale. This appeals to my sense of intrigue.


Among the contributors was another friend, Ingrid Duffy. We first met at a Alice Fox Summer School, 2 years ago, and we discovered we had a mutual friend who lives in the Netherlands. It's a small and fascinating world.  Ingrid is a textile artist who often incorporates her photography into her work.  She is taking part in an Art Trail and I might try and go along. I only took one photo of Ingrid's stand, what was I thinking?!








There were a number of student groups exhibiting and also print making demonstrations.  This beautiful press was recently given to the John Jarrold Printing Museum and been carefully restored.  Based in Norwich this museum is only open on Wednesday mornings and it is on my list to visit, one day.



There were lots more stands but I will end with the Norfolk Longbook.  This is a collaborative project and artists, poets and writers were invited to submit their work. You can see this concertina book has achieved an impressionable length and there is a wonderful variety on it's double sided pages, with more on the table to add.












































As you can see, the standard of work at Turn the Page is impressive and I felt privileged to be there and to meet the artists. I came home inspired and excited by what I saw, and I look forward to visiting again next year. Thanks for joining me in this post visit, and hope you liked what you saw too. 

Turn the Page artists book fair - Part One

This weekend saw me at Turn the Page artists book fair, in Norwich.  I’d been looking forward to this for some time, and over the proceeding months and weeks I watched three of my friends completing work for their stands.  My heart missed a beat or two when I entered the venue because there was such an array of book art and some extremely talented artists. It was hard to know where to start! But the beginning is always a good place - so we visited the first stand and carried on from there.

It would be impossible to show everything so here are some of the works that most connected with me.  My husband doesn't have the same level of interest, and said that once he’d seen enough he would potter off and meet me later. The fact that he didn’t potter off shows that there was much to see and admire!  There was a lovely atmosphere and all the artists were friendly and enthusiastic. But 
what stood out was hearing the stories - of how or why the artists made the books. And everyone was happy for me to take photos of their work too, I appreciate that because it is nice to look back and enjoy the experience again through memory.


So come with me and I’ll show you around…..
Visually, this was one of the show stoppers for me.  These books made by Dizzy Pragnell are pages made from fruit and vegetables - I kid you not!  Each is a wafer thin pressed image and the photo does not do them justice.





These are cabbage leaves...



apple.....



kiwi....



and carrot...

Each book was exquisite and I could fill a blog post about each stand that I visited, but I need to move on.....

Next is Pien Rotterdam. One of my favourite books of hers had a collection of fabric swatches that belonged to her grandmother and great grandmother. Pien inherited these fabrics and over the years she has used them. It was only when she started to run out that she thought it important to hold on to the memory and keep a record of the collection.


On the back of the book a small label tells what the fabric had been used for. Pien remembers these... 










Pien also made smaller copies of the book to sell. Each has original swatches and as someone who appreciates nostalgia I really admired Pien's work.  She had lots of other examples of work too, including a stamp album in which she has added beautiful snippets.  Each page is a different colour co-ordination.




Next was Peter Knight.  He makes copper etchings and uses these to make amazing prints and three dimensional constructions.





This one had particular interest as I visited Down House in recent weeks and have always been fascinated by Darwin's work.

Another stand that held my attention was artist, Jane Sasanow. I love constructions and how shadows and surprise comes from folds and concealment. I have often used these constructions to make my own books, but I was inspired how Jane had put these together, to create collections and works of art. Jane will be adding photos to her new Instagram site.



























Another series of work that captured my imagination was by Annette Kreiser. 

I love to use found objects in my own work, as it is a way to create longevity.  This is even better where stories are involved too, so imagine my excitement when I heard that some of Annette's marks are made by pieces of WWII aircraft, washed up on the Norfolk coast line. Straight away I was taken back to the crashed WWII plane I found in the Shetland islands. But I digress....




There was so much to see that it was necessary to take a brief break, but a short walk and refreshments gave the much needed energy to go back for more.

And I suspect you might welcome a break at this point too!  So I'll come back with the rest, tomorrow. Thanks for joining me in this visit and I hope you are as inspired by these art works as I am.
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